Amrabad Tiger Reserve: You May Not Spot Tigers But It's A Great Ride


If there's one thing I've realised during the pandemic — it's that you don't have to travel too far to explore a new destination. As someone who lives in Hyderabad, I haven't visited my neck of the woods. At least, as much as I should. One of my cousins was obsessing over tiger reserves, but we didn't want to risk traveling to other states. That's when we stumbled upon Amrabad Tiger Reserve.


Tucked in Nallamalla Hills, Amrabad Tiger Reserve is one of those weekend getaways you won't regret taking, even though you may not spot tigers. Before we signed up for our safari, our guide explicitly told us that it's perhaps difficult to see a tiger, but we might spot other wild animals. Regarded as the second-largest tiger reserve in India, Amrabad is a three-hour drive from Hyderabad. We packed a little picnic and started by 7 am; coupled with ample breaks and a visit to Uma Maheshwaram, we reached Amrabad by 3 pm.



Yup, that's a lot of time for something that's right around the corner but then it's not every day that you dash through roads flanked by forests, right? On our way, monkeys were plentiful and some imps snatch food off your hands. If you're planning to picnic under the trees (like us), practice caution. There's a tiny village before reaching Amrabad where you can grab a quick lunch too.


The safari is crowded on weekends — you've been warned. At INR 1,200, a group of ten can board a jeep. We were six, and we decided to have the jeep to ourselves. During the one and a half-hour ride, we went through several winding roads, Nizam's hunting grounds, and idyllic spots with langurs, deers, and peacocks strolling. While we weren't allowed to alight the jeep at several locations, the tour guide pointed us locations where we could step out and saunter. The jungle, we were told, is home to indigenous tribe, Chenchus, and if you're interested in knowing more about them, I recommend reading this piece.


We were dropped at Farhabad View Point which offers a sweeping view of the forest reserve. It was sunny, misty, and yet we could see how enormous the forest was! After spending a couple of minutes there, we hopped on to return. Apparently during Saleshwaram Jathara, visitors can drive down using their vehicles. The temple is open only for five days a year; during this jathara, it attracts thousands of devotees, wildlife enthusiasts, and adventurists. Besides, there's a trekking trail that one can explore and we were told, devotees walk several kms to visit the temple.


But in all honesty, it wasn't about the desire to spot a tiger or a Sambar (which we did spot) — the ride itself was quite fun and dusty. If you're someone who loves looking at various species of plants and birds, Amrabad offers plenty. And then some more.



Note: If you're visiting, please follow all the guidelines that your tour guide suggests. If he asks you not to step out of the jeep, do respect that and don't litter. Of course you won't, you're not an idiot. I hope.


The safari can get quite crowded on weekends and if you're planning to visit on weekends, try to go before lunch time to avoid a crowd.